Why We're Teachers: a Florida science teacher's experience in a Nasa research project

Why We're Teachers: a Florida science teacher's experience in a Nasa research project

A high school science teacher took part in the Nasa/Ipac Teacher Archive Research Program to experience first-hand how scientific research works. She shares her experience and the lessons she brought back to the classroom.

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Funding the search for dark matter with citizen science

Funding the search for dark matter with citizen science

Milkyway@Home faces a second year without federal grants. Fortunately the project's community of citizen scientists are coming to the rescue. Learn more about the crowdfunding effort to help Dr. Heidi Newberg and her minions continue the search for the Milky Way Galaxy's hidden dark matter.

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My take on the Eskimo Nebula

Ten thousand years ago, as glaciers from Earth’s last ice age retreated towards the poles and humans planted their first crops, a Sun-like star died. Fifteen years ago the Hubble Space Telescope observed its shattered remains. Thanks to Nasa’s open data policies I used that data to create my own portrait of the Eskimo Nebula.

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Teen space explorers enter Google Science Fair regional finals

Teen space explorers enter Google Science Fair regional finals

Young space explorers from Europe and the United States became regional finalists in the 2015 Google Science Fair with projects ranging from spacecraft engineering to astrophysics to exobiology (life on other worlds).

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Hubble and the Amateurs - the public's role in the 25-year-old space telescope

The Hubble Space Telescope’s 25th anniversary produced a wave of media coverage. The scientists, engineers, and astronauts responsible for Hubble’s legacy deserve every bit of that praise, but the media didn’t pay much attention to Hubble’s role in amateur astronomy. Read on to learn how amateurs work with Hubble astronomers and even use Hubble data themselves.

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Citizen scientists' roles change as Big Data sweeps astronomy

Crowdsourced projects like Galaxy Zoo and Mercury Mappers exist because amateurs combine strength in numbers with visual perception skills better than computer algorithms. But next-generation observatories will erode those strengths. The role of citizen scientists will change, but it will remain critical for the future of science.

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Spot stars exploding over Australia with Snapshot Supernova

Snapshot Supernova asks the world’s citizen scientists and armchair astronomers to help discover stars exploding over Australia. It’s the latest project form the Zooniverse crowdsourcing service. The Zooniverse’s co-founder and Oxford University astrophysicist Chris Lintott explained to me how the project evolved from earlier supernova-hunting projects to make its first supernova sighting within hours of the project’s launch.

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Amateur astronomer helps pros study super-Saturn orbiting another star

None of last week’s coverage of super-Saturn J1407b explored the role amateurs played in the research. I spoke with Belgian amateur astronomer Franz-Josef Hambsch about his passion for variable star astronomy and how that led to his participation in the super-Saturn research.

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Crowdsourced discoveries... in space!

Crowdsourced discoveries... in space!

The power of crowdsourced citizen science lies in its ability to turn millions of hours of volunteers’ contributions into scientific research that would never have been possible before. Scientists published several papers last month that expand our understanding of galaxies and star formation.

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