Lucid, the student cosmic-ray detector going into space

British high school students will send the Lucid, the Langton Ultimate Cosmic-ray Intensity Detector, cosmic-ray observatory to orbit in 2014. Adapting sensors from the Large Hadron Collider to detect intense photons, subatomic particles, and cosmic-ray particles, the student-designed experiment will mark the first time this technology has been used in open space and will produce science that nobody has seen before.

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Radio Jove Student Radio Telescope

Get a radio telescope kit from Nasa and listen to Jupiter’s magnetic storms. The Radio Jove Project created a do-it-yourself kit with little more than a wire and some basic electronics, but the simple telescope will introduce you to the strange world of radio astronomy.

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Restoring Historic Radio Telescopes

Today’s state-of-the art technologies become tomorrow’s obsolete castoffs as scientific frontiers advance. Radio telescopes built in the 1950’s and 1960’s pioneered radio astronomy and tracked spacecraft during the early Space Age. Groups of amateurs restored several historic telescopes to conduct amateur and student radio astronomy research.

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Amateur Space News April 9, 2014

Today’s amateur headlines include a proposed community observatory in Jackson Hole, a new educational seismic network in Trinidad and Tobago, profiles of a Mars One candidate and a high school rocket team, plus reports on the Mars opposition and the Lyrids meteor shower.

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Cosmic Ray Observatory Project

The Cosmic Ray Observatory Project links secondary schools across Nebraska with professional astronomers and physicists to study cosmic rays. The students build networked cosmic ray detectors that they mount on the roofs of their schools. The data flow into the project’s archives, letting professional astronomers study high-energy cosmic rays.

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HiSparc educational cosmic ray detector

HiSparc (English-language site) links secondary schools across Europe with professional astronomers and physicists to study cosmic rays. The students build networked cosmic ray detectors that they mount on the roofs of their schools. The data flow into the project’s archives, letting professional astronomers study high-energy cosmic rays.

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