Make stellar images with the Bradford Robotic Telescope

Make stellar images with the Bradford Robotic Telescope

I didn't have to spend $10,000 on my own telescope to create this image of the Orion Nebula. Thanks to the Bradford Robotic Telescope it only cost me £3 (about $5). Created by scientists at the University of Bradford to support British primary and secondary schools, anyone can subscribe to their service and create dozens of images every month.

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Weekend Amateur: Using Nasa's SkyView virtual observatory to create stellar images

Weekend Amateur: Using Nasa's SkyView virtual observatory to create stellar images

There's no way I could afford my own 2.5 meter telescope, much less a mountain-top observatory. Thanks to Nasa and its SkyView virtual observatory, I created this image of the globular cluster Messier 3 using professional data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. You can too.

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Supernova Alerts

Supernovae and other short-lived, unpredictable cosmic events pose a challenge astronomers. They want to collect data during the earliest phases of the exposure, but critical hours or days may pass before anyone notices the event. The astronomy community has several alert systems that spread the word so professional and amateur astronomers alike can observe the stellar explosions.

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SalsaJ Astronomical Image Analysis App

SalsaJ was developed to let middle and high school students analyze real astronomical data in the classroom, but it also works as an accessible app for amateurs of all ages.

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TerraLook makes remote sensing easier for amateurs

The United States Geological Survey created TerraLook to make satellite imaging easier for people outside the remote sensing community. Using the raw data generated by LandSat and other remote sensing satellites requires training and expensive software. For most people - journalists, students, and other amateurs - a picture is all they need to illustrate a story, document conditions, or explain how things change over time. TerraLook makes it easier for them to use the forty year record of LandSat images. 

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Satellite Sentinel Project uses space to make a difference

The Satellite Sentinel Project uses satellite images to document human rights abuses and civilian casualties in South Sudan. Their analysis complements on-the-ground reports collected by the Enough Project and helps to raise awareness of atrocities committed by armed groups that prey on defenseless civilians.

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Simple Aurora Monitor

German amateur aurora-spotters Karsten Hanskul and Dirk Langenbach, frustrated with the space weather agencies’ imprecise aurora forecasts, decided to build their own aurora detector. They turned it into a kit, the Simple Aurora Monitor, so anyone could build one

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