Amateur Space Weekly - June 28

Amateur Space Weekly - June 28

Student experiments destroyed in SpaceX explosion, Europe's CanSat championship goes to Austrian and British schools, Australia's DIY satellite project and more in this week's recap of amateur space exploration.

Read More

Radio Jove Student Radio Telescope

Get a radio telescope kit from Nasa and listen to Jupiter’s magnetic storms. The Radio Jove Project created a do-it-yourself kit with little more than a wire and some basic electronics, but the simple telescope will introduce you to the strange world of radio astronomy.

Read More

Restoring Historic Radio Telescopes

Today’s state-of-the art technologies become tomorrow’s obsolete castoffs as scientific frontiers advance. Radio telescopes built in the 1950’s and 1960’s pioneered radio astronomy and tracked spacecraft during the early Space Age. Groups of amateurs restored several historic telescopes to conduct amateur and student radio astronomy research.

Read More

Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope

The Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope program lets students across America study radio emissions from the giant planets and the black holes in distant galaxies using one of Nasa’s giant radio dish antennas. More than 32,000 primary and secondary school students have conducted real scientific research since the program began twenty years ago. Their work supports professional research and helps the Juno and Spitzer space missions.

Read More

Skynet Junior Scholar Program

The Skynet Junior Scholar Program lets over 1,400 middle school students in Wisconsin, Virginia, and North Carolina learn astronomy and even conduct astronomical research by controlling professional telescopes in Chile, Australia, and the United States.

Read More

Pulse@Parkes lets students study pulsars

Pulse@Parkes has let over one thousand Australian high school students take control of the Parkes Radio Telescope to study pulsars and contribute to long-term professional research projects since 2007. The students meet at the Australia Telescope National Facility headquarters in Sydney where they give directions to the scientists and staff at the Parkes Observatory. The data they collect lets them measure the distance to a pulsar and its properties. It also lets professional scientists conduct research on the long-term behavior of pulsars.

Read More