Amateur Space Weekly - February 29

Amateur Space Weekly - February 29

Amateur CubeSats get free rides into orbit, coders help space robot see, zero-g curry and veggie meatballs, educational seismic networks, Argentinian asteroid discovery, and a Japanese supernova discovery are some of this week's reports from the world of amateur space exploration.

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Amateur Space Weekly - February 15

Amateur Space Weekly - February 15

Crowdsourcing counts of lunar craters, using zero-g for art and education, public contributions to earthquake science, and schools exploring the Kuiper Belt are just some of last week's news about amateur space exploration.

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Amateur Space Weekly - September 18

Community observatories in Australia and the US, Canadian teenagers conduct microgravity research, crowdsourcing aurora and comet sightings, and more in this week's recap of news from the world of amateur space exploration.

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Spot stars exploding over Australia with Snapshot Supernova

Snapshot Supernova asks the world’s citizen scientists and armchair astronomers to help discover stars exploding over Australia. It’s the latest project form the Zooniverse crowdsourcing service. The Zooniverse’s co-founder and Oxford University astrophysicist Chris Lintott explained to me how the project evolved from earlier supernova-hunting projects to make its first supernova sighting within hours of the project’s launch.

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Amateur Space News April 30, 2014

Balloons may spend more time in near space, an Irish amateur astronomer discovered a supernova, a Zooniverse co-founder now helps scientists publish code to github, amateur rocketry and satellite news, and more Mars news in today’s headlines.

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Supernova Alerts

Supernovae and other short-lived, unpredictable cosmic events pose a challenge astronomers. They want to collect data during the earliest phases of the exposure, but critical hours or days may pass before anyone notices the event. The astronomy community has several alert systems that spread the word so professional and amateur astronomers alike can observe the stellar explosions.

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SalsaJ Astronomical Image Analysis App

SalsaJ was developed to let middle and high school students analyze real astronomical data in the classroom, but it also works as an accessible app for amateurs of all ages.

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